Gajanana Full Song Download

About This Video

Edit

Thoongaavanam Full Film

The Truth About Exercise

The Jungle Book


We are Against Pirasy

It'll be the Internet and piracy that will kill film. There's a philosophy that the Internet should be free, but the reality is that piracy will destroy the film industry and film as an art form because it's expensive to make a movie. Maybe you'll have funky little independent movies, and it'll go back and then start up again some other way.
Note :- Copyright in cinematographic works is more complex in nature as there exists a variety of copyrights in a single work and many a times these rights are also overlapping. The first right in a film is the `theatrical right’ i.e. the right to exhibit films in theatres. The producer is the copyright holder. The distributors buy theatrical rights from producers and then make some arrangements with the theatre owners for actual exhibition to the public. The theatrical rights are limited by territory and time. Films are also released in video cassettes. In fact, these days viewing film at home has become more popular than seeing the same at theatres. The producers sell the video rights to another party, who makes video cassettes for sale in the market. These cassettes are meant for `home viewing’ only i.e. one can buy a copy of it for seeing at home with family members and friends. Such cassettes can not be used for showing the film in cables or through satellite channels. Because showing films in cables or satellite channels require acquisition of separate sets of rights namely `cable rights’, and `satellite rights’. A cable network is generally limited to local areas as it requires receivers (viewers’ TVs) which are to be physically connected through cable wire to the operators. In case of satellite channels, however, there is no such physical limit as transmission takes place through air and received at the users end by dish antenna(s). Interestingly in India satellite transmissions, in most of the cases, reach to endusers through cable networks only.
The cable networks in India work in a two-tier system. At the top there are main operators who transmit their programmes through numerous small local operators on a franchise basis. As mentioned earlier programmes of satellite channels reach the viewers through cable networks. The (main)cable operators do not pay anything to satellite channels for showing latter’s programmes in the network, except for pay channels (e.g. ESPN, Zee Cinema, Movie Club etc). The small cable operators, however, share their incomes with their respective main operators. The revenue for small operators come from the subscription of viewers.
Music is an integral part of any cinematographic work. In India, film sound tracks account for almost 80% of the total music market. Even if film producer has the copyright in the film, the music included in the film is the outcome of efforts undertaken by a separate group of creative people such as the composer, lyricists etc.- each of which is a rightholder of its own right. Generally the producer sells this right to a music company who makes cassettes/CDs of such songs for sale in the market. The incidence of a large number of rights in a single work and the involvement of a variety of right holders make the copyright issue very complicated in cinematographic works.
Piracy of cinematographic works takes two principal forms, namely `video piracy’ and `cable piracy’. However, piracy in one form can spill over and affect the revenues of the other. Video piracy takes place when a film is produced in the form of video cassette without taking proper authorisation from the right holder i.e. producer. Many times producers of films sell video rights to another party (generally after six weeks or more of release in theatres ) who makes video cassettes for selling or lending. The video cassettes kept for sale are meant for home viewing only. Any commercial use of such cassettes like in video parlours or in cable networks amounts to copyright violation. Two types of video piracies are common in India. One, where video right for films has not been sold at all (by the producer) but video cassettes are available in the market for buying or borrowing. And two, when video right is (legally) sold to a party, but cassettes are made and sold by others (pirates) as well.
Cable piracy is unauthorised transmission of films through cable network. As mentioned above, showing a film in a cable network requires acquisition of proper authorisation from the rightholder. But many a time, films , especially the new releases, are shown through cables without such authorisation, which tantamounts to piracy.
Piracy is a rare phenomenon in satellite channels because such channels are organised and generally do not show films without buying proper rights. But there are cases where right of one channel operator is violated by others.
It is very difficult to give even a rough estimate of video piracy in India because information in this regard is scanty and not accessible. But video piracy in both the forms are quite rampant here. Besides this, piracy through video parlours is largely prevalent normally in the rural India or smaller towns. Perhaps more widespread and damaging is the cable piracy. These days almost all new releases are shown in the cable simultaneously with the exhibitions in theatres . As per a resolution adopted by the Film Makers Combine, video release of a film can be made only after six weeks of theatrical release. But cable operators show such films much before the stipulated time period. This is a clear case of cable piracy and its extent is considerably high in country. All parties involved in the legitimate transaction of films – from the producers to the theatre owners, lose heavily because of widespread video or cable piracy. The Government also loses because pirates’ activities do not bring in any revenue such as entertainment tax at theatres and excise duty and sales tax at the points of legitimate production/selling.

Double Barrel Malayalam Movie Full 2015


We are Against Pirasy

It'll be the Internet and piracy that will kill film. There's a philosophy that the Internet should be free, but the reality is that piracy will destroy the film industry and film as an art form because it's expensive to make a movie. Maybe you'll have funky little independent movies, and it'll go back and then start up again some other way.
Note :- Copyright in cinematographic works is more complex in nature as there exists a variety of copyrights in a single work and many a times these rights are also overlapping. The first right in a film is the `theatrical right’ i.e. the right to exhibit films in theatres. The producer is the copyright holder. The distributors buy theatrical rights from producers and then make some arrangements with the theatre owners for actual exhibition to the public. The theatrical rights are limited by territory and time. Films are also released in video cassettes. In fact, these days viewing film at home has become more popular than seeing the same at theatres. The producers sell the video rights to another party, who makes video cassettes for sale in the market. These cassettes are meant for `home viewing’ only i.e. one can buy a copy of it for seeing at home with family members and friends. Such cassettes can not be used for showing the film in cables or through satellite channels. Because showing films in cables or satellite channels require acquisition of separate sets of rights namely `cable rights’, and `satellite rights’. A cable network is generally limited to local areas as it requires receivers (viewers’ TVs) which are to be physically connected through cable wire to the operators. In case of satellite channels, however, there is no such physical limit as transmission takes place through air and received at the users end by dish antenna(s). Interestingly in India satellite transmissions, in most of the cases, reach to endusers through cable networks only.
The cable networks in India work in a two-tier system. At the top there are main operators who transmit their programmes through numerous small local operators on a franchise basis. As mentioned earlier programmes of satellite channels reach the viewers through cable networks. The (main)cable operators do not pay anything to satellite channels for showing latter’s programmes in the network, except for pay channels (e.g. ESPN, Zee Cinema, Movie Club etc). The small cable operators, however, share their incomes with their respective main operators. The revenue for small operators come from the subscription of viewers.
Music is an integral part of any cinematographic work. In India, film sound tracks account for almost 80% of the total music market. Even if film producer has the copyright in the film, the music included in the film is the outcome of efforts undertaken by a separate group of creative people such as the composer, lyricists etc.- each of which is a rightholder of its own right. Generally the producer sells this right to a music company who makes cassettes/CDs of such songs for sale in the market. The incidence of a large number of rights in a single work and the involvement of a variety of right holders make the copyright issue very complicated in cinematographic works.
Piracy of cinematographic works takes two principal forms, namely `video piracy’ and `cable piracy’. However, piracy in one form can spill over and affect the revenues of the other. Video piracy takes place when a film is produced in the form of video cassette without taking proper authorisation from the right holder i.e. producer. Many times producers of films sell video rights to another party (generally after six weeks or more of release in theatres ) who makes video cassettes for selling or lending. The video cassettes kept for sale are meant for home viewing only. Any commercial use of such cassettes like in video parlours or in cable networks amounts to copyright violation. Two types of video piracies are common in India. One, where video right for films has not been sold at all (by the producer) but video cassettes are available in the market for buying or borrowing. And two, when video right is (legally) sold to a party, but cassettes are made and sold by others (pirates) as well.
Cable piracy is unauthorised transmission of films through cable network. As mentioned above, showing a film in a cable network requires acquisition of proper authorisation from the rightholder. But many a time, films , especially the new releases, are shown through cables without such authorisation, which tantamounts to piracy.
Piracy is a rare phenomenon in satellite channels because such channels are organised and generally do not show films without buying proper rights. But there are cases where right of one channel operator is violated by others.
It is very difficult to give even a rough estimate of video piracy in India because information in this regard is scanty and not accessible. But video piracy in both the forms are quite rampant here. Besides this, piracy through video parlours is largely prevalent normally in the rural India or smaller towns. Perhaps more widespread and damaging is the cable piracy. These days almost all new releases are shown in the cable simultaneously with the exhibitions in theatres . As per a resolution adopted by the Film Makers Combine, video release of a film can be made only after six weeks of theatrical release. But cable operators show such films much before the stipulated time period. This is a clear case of cable piracy and its extent is considerably high in country. All parties involved in the legitimate transaction of films – from the producers to the theatre owners, lose heavily because of widespread video or cable piracy. The Government also loses because pirates’ activities do not bring in any revenue such as entertainment tax at theatres and excise duty and sales tax at the points of legitimate production/selling.

Loham Malayalam Movie Full 2015